Study reports Early Education improves children's chances of attending University

Study reports Early Education improves children's chances of attending University

Recently, The Australian newspaper reported that targeted early childhood education can improve children's opportunities of obtaining post-secondary qualifications.

The findings of a three-decade long American-based study by the University of Minnesota involving more than 1000 children, found maths and literacy tutoring at pre-school level could boost children's chances of earning degrees by 41 per cent. 

Ongoing additional tutoring during primary school years further boosted the children's chances, with a significant increase in the number of children who received specialised tutoring growing up to complete bachelor degrees or masters degrees. 

At Lifelong Learning Centres around Australia, children are encouraged to explore maths and literacy through natural extensions of their learning interests in a way that stimulates and rewards their curiosity. Education Leader and Early Childhood Teacher, Kelly Hallas believes traditional tutoring is only one element of supporting a child to reach their full potential. 
Eagleby Children's Centre Early Childhood Teacher Alexandra Mann and her School Readiness students investigate mathematical concepts
Photo: Eagleby Children's Centre Early Childhood Teacher Alexandra Mann and her School Readiness class explore mathematical concepts through shapes.
 
"The Lifelong Learning School Readiness program, which is available in more than 160 child care centres around Australia, supports children's transitions to school, preparing them for a positive start," Ms Hallas said.
 
"Early childhood professionals understand that social, emotional and physical aspects of the child must be nurtured in order for their academic and intellectual development to take place."
 
According to Ms Hallas, children's early access to a 'tutoring-style' model such as found with an experienced Early Childhood Teacher in a pre-school environment has benefits which go beyond academic growth.

"The very experience of a child receiving the one-on-one attention from an educator - be it in maths, literacy or any other field - stimulates their natural love of learning, and confidence in their abilities, right at that stage where a child's self-image is being formed," Ms Hallas said.

"The Lifelong Learning approach is founded on our belief in the uniqueness of each child - we call it their 'indikiduality'. Our Early Childhood Teachers focus on meeting the individual needs and interests of each child, to ensure they develop a positive disposition for learning which they will carry with them through school and into university and beyond," she said.

Lifelong Learning Centres around Australia are welcoming the 'Class of 2018' to our School Readiness classrooms. Find a Lifelong Learning Centre near you and book a tour ​by calling 1800 Child Care. 

View the original article in The Australian here.

Posted: 2/7/2018 10:10:59 AM by Carla
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